3D Printing Lace- “Punto in Aria”

2016

This project was inspired by historical costume from the 19th century, especially from the decoration of the costumes and the hand made lace that attached to the garments. There is no definite date in which the lace was “invented”. However, it is most likely that what we now regard to as ‘lace’, arose in the early sixteenth century, in Venice. Lace was soon to be known as “punto in aria” (stitches in the air). Lace allows designs to break free from geometric forms- a boundary imposed by working with fabric. Lace was all hand made from the best materials available at the time and was made especially for women’s costumes, to emphasize the wearer’s status and wealth. “Punto in aria”- combining new technology and old traditional crafts. This special outfit is inspired by traditional old lace from previous centuries costumes, but has an added twist to it- contrary to the hand-made lace, this 3D shapes did not come in contact with any hands during the making process, and even the pattern itself is an algorithm and was not designed or molded by human hands. This project is my interpretation to “stitches in the air”, while utilizing a unique variety of tools (mathematics, algorithms, technology, 3D software and more). The 3D lace is made of ABS filament and therefore is hard and rigid. However, the shapes are hollow, therefore, flexible. My research revolved around discovering a new way of making lace. I 3D printed lace-like shapes that have the opposite characteristics from the traditional lace. The 3D shapes are completely digital made, using only algorithms and graphs to make them “computer made”, rather than “hand-made”. The changing of the shapes is endless- changing only numbers in the original algorithm to make a beautiful variety of shapes. The dress includes the 3D shapes combined with lace, connected together with a bottom skirt, also inspired by the historical pleated skirt from the costume. The 3D printed shapes are a result of a unique cooperation between Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design (Fashion and Jewelry Department) and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, (Prof. Shlomo Magdassi Research Lab) using SolidWorks software and MakerBot 3D printer.

Model:  Anya Ligay
Mentors: Claudette Zorea
Photography: Nitai Shanaani

My 3D shapes of lace on solidworks software & collection illustrations


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